Criminal cases are about the law. If you broke the rules, you could face a conviction. 

However, your case is also about facts. Sometimes, these facts are complex. That is where special witnesses come in. Here are three of the most common types of professionals who might provide evidence in your case. 

1. Psychologists 

Your criminal charge probably requires the prosecution to prove intent in order to secure a conviction. Mental health and social health professionals, such as psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers often provide testimony to illustrate intent — or lack thereof. 

If it is possible that you did not knowingly or willfully commit the acts in question, perhaps due to a temporary impairment or a psychological condition, the court needs to know that. Special psychological witnesses are typically the best candidates to communicate this type of nuanced, technical information. 

2. Forensic scientists 

The physical sciences could provide information about your case that no witness or circumstantial evidence could. However, technical data is difficult to understand. Furthermore, the process of gathering and cataloging data has an effect on reliability. 

There are many different areas of focus in forensic science. These include chemistry, physics and medicine. Professionals in each area could potentially uncover flaws in the prosecution’s collection, recording or interpretation of evidence. 

3. Doctors 

The cause of a death or injury is not always obvious. Medical tests, such as blood or breath measurements, sometimes fail or provide false data. Doctors might provide evidence that explains these issues and more. 

Before expert testimony goes before the court, you may want to ask for clarification to fully understand how the information will assist with your case.